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Small Group Leading 101

Small Group Leading 101

The first few weeks of a new Sunday school year can seem overwhelming, but I found several things that have helped me over the years to be well prepared and have a smooth running Sunday morning.

At the Beginning of the Year

I read the curriculum introduction and found very practical suggestions. I checked out the appendices that provided even more help. And I printed out the scope and sequence of the curriculum so that I could see where the curriculum was heading.

As I prepared for my role as small group leader it was good to remember that my job was not to re-teach the lesson that the teacher teaches but to:

  1. Guide the children
  2. Help them discover answers
  3. Bring them to application truths they have been taught
  4. Make connections with previous lessons’ themes or chronology
  5. Work on Scripture memory
  6. Pray for concerns on their hearts

…all for the purpose of their growth in Christ-likeness and the glory of God.

Small Group Leading 101

During the Week

It helps tremendously to read the Scripture text on Sunday night so my mind can mull over the next week’s lesson and ask the Lord for personal application. Reading it multiple times prior to actually looking at the lesson enables my heart to be impacted with the truth we hope to communicate to the students. Then I read the teaching material and the application section to know the content and possible applications I can help the children apply to their own lives. Looking at the student workbook (or journal) helps me know what we will work on during our small group time and how it connects with the application questions. Writing out the specific questions I want to ask the children keeps me on task. Finally, an essential part of preparation is praying for the volunteer team, students and their parents. After all, only God can change hearts and empower the ministry.

May the Lord bless your preparations and interactions with the students He has placed in your sphere of influence, for His glory and their good (and yours as well)!

Sunday Morning

I make a habit of getting to the classroom early which makes a huge difference. A great way to start the morning is to spend time in prayer as a team. Then I could look at the classroom space and think about how I might:

  1. Minimize distractions to help the kids focus
  2. Make sure all needed materials were easily accessible (Student Workbooks or Journals, crayons/markers, pencils/pens, a notebook to record prayer requests…)

This allows me to focus on the kids as soon as they show up BECAUSE…Sunday school begins when the first child arrives! Greet the children with a smile and use their names—it truly makes a difference and they notice. Engage in conversation as soon as they come in. Sit with your small group during the worship and teaching time. Model the behavior you expect. Be alert for distracting or inappropriate behavior and support the teacher by intervening if necessary. Take notes on the lesson as it is taught so you can adjust questions you have planned to line up with what has been shared.

In Your Small Group

  1. Open in prayer.
  2. Introduce new children.
  3. State your expectations (especially at the beginning of the year and as a periodic reminder).
  4. Try to involve each child as you work through what you have prepared.
  5. Work on Workbook/Journal pages. This is key to applying what they have learned.
  6. Practice the memory verse and teach age appropriate Bible skills (i.e., Books of the Bible), as time permits.
  7. Take time to pray with your group at the end of your time together and encourage children to pray aloud.
  8. Make sure to record the prayer requests and follow up later on possible answers.
  9. Thank God for His help and ask Him to work in the students’ hearts.
  10. Have students help clean up your area and be sure to send home the GIFT page for parents to review.

As a small group leader I love connecting with “my” children on a regular basis. I get to know them, hear their thoughts and learn what is important to them. I pray for them and with them about their understanding of God and the concerns on their hearts. It is a privilege and joy to be used by the Lord in their lives. May your experience be so!

 

Already Relevant

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Our young people—especially teenagers—are looking for answers. As they grow and mature, they increasingly have big questions and big concerns. They are searching for answers that make sense for both the world outside their door and their day-to-day lives. As Christian parents and teachers, we need to carefully direct them to the Bible. But there is a right way and wrong way to go about this. Consider these words by Pastor Eric McKiddie in his post “Stop Trying to Make the Bible Relevant to Teenagers”:

It’s easy to feel pressure to make the Bible seem cool and relevant to teenagers…

In my years in youth ministry, though, I’ve seen unhelpful and even harmful methods of trying to make Scripture relevant. Book publishers make Bibles look like magazines, youth workers preach a hipster Jesus, and parents confuse their child’s involvement in a fun youth group for a growing relationship with God.

Yet in our efforts to make Scripture more entertaining, we actually confirm suspicions that it is in fact boring and irrelevant. And when youth workers aren’t as cool as they think they are, their efforts end up looking cheesy, which is the last thing that will help a teenager see the Bible’s importance.

…If you want teens—whether in your home or youth group—to appreciate the Bible, the first thing you must do is trust its relevance in your own heart. That trust should come across in how you talk about what the Bible says and why it matters. Scripture testifies to its own importance for God’s people, sometimes even pointing to young people in particular (Prov. 2:1–15; Eph. 6:1–3; 2 Tim. 3:16).

Peter’s words are especially helpful: “His divine power has granted to us all things that pertain to life and godliness, through the knowledge of him who called us to his own glory and excellence” (2 Pet. 1:3). Notice that Peter writes, “all things that pertain to life and godliness.” That means stress over grades, sexual temptation, loneliness, awkwardness—and how to honor God in each of these areas. But also notice how the power for everything that pertains to life and godliness comes to us—through the knowledge of God. And how do we attain this vital knowledge? Through the Scriptures.

At CDG, we are striving to do just that in the teen years—to present our students with a vital knowledge of Scripture that explores essential doctrines of the Christian faith in a manner that not only informs the mind but also challenges the heart by paying attention to how these doctrines intersect with ALL aspects of everyday life. In other words, showing that the Bible is already, in and of itself, relevant.

There are least four ways in particular that our youth curricula does this:

  • Encouraging teachers to devote an adequate amount of time in spiritual preparation for each lesson so that he or she teaches from a heart that has been personally transformed by the truths of Scripture. It gives the teacher an opportunity to share personal insights and practical application. Students take notice of this.
  • A lesson content that provides examples of connections between Scripture texts and real-life scenarios.
  • A depth of teaching that does not shy away from difficult doctrines and topics: evil, suffering, gender issues, etc.
  • A “Small Group Application” section following each lesson with carefully crafted questions and discussion points to actively engage the students to see how the truths of Scripture apply to each of them in a very personal way.

Click on each of our youth curricula to find out more and see lesson samples.

Teach Me Your Way 
A Study for Youth on Surrender to Jesus and Submission to His Way

Abiding in Jesus
A Study for Youth on Trusting Jesus and Encouraging Others

Your Word Is Truth
A Study for Youth on Seeing All of Life Through the Truth of Scripture

Rejoicing in God’s Good Design
A Study for Youth on Biblical Manhood and Womanhood

Open My Eyes
A Study for Youth on Studying the Bible

(Image courtesy of Ambro at FreeDigitalPhotos.net.)

The ABCs of God: An Inside Look at Application

The ABCs of God

In a Sunday school class, application discussion is vital after the lesson because it is in this time that the children are most personally challenged to embrace the truth with their hearts and respond to it in their lives. Biblical truth is not meant to merely remain head knowledge, but is meant to transform the heart. Small Group leaders have the privilege of leading this application time as they serve as mentors for a group of four to eight students during the year.

In the revised curriculum, The ABCs of God, the application section has been rewritten to better equip small group leaders. Each lesson includes four to six topics, based on main ideas in the lesson, to choose from and discuss with their students.

During the week, leaders are encouraged to study the lesson and pray through the questions to determine which are appropriate for their group. The aim of the discussion is not merely to see whether or not children remember the lesson, but more importantly, to help children focus on the heart issues and ask how the truths presented in the lesson personally apply to their own lives.

The Student Workbook is another valuable tool to use during small group time. The activities directly tie into and enhance the discussion questions leaders will be asking as they review key points of the lesson. The workbook also encourages students with different learning styles by providing a visual and tactile outlet to help process what they are learning.

Look inside the curriculum and see the changes! Here are several examples of the new workbook pages and a sample of the Small Group Application from the lesson on Incomprehensible.

 

 

Lesson 2: Incomprehensible
God is more than we can fully understand.

Workbook

Ask the children to recall the letter of the alphabet that was introduced in today’s lesson. Instruct them to look in the workbook for the page with the large letter “I.” Read the memory verse from Job 37:5 and encourage the children to recite it with you. Point to the words “cannot comprehend.” Then help the children trace the word “COMPREHEND” where indicated. Explain that these two words together mean “incomprehensible.” Give the children markers, crayons, and/or stickers to decorate the letter.

Knowing God

Ask the children to each tell you one or two things about their parents. Do the children know everything there is to know about their parents? Even though they don’t, do they still know enough to love their parents? Next, ask them to tell you something that they know about God.

What does it mean for us that God is more than we can fully understand? However, can we still know enough about God to love and trust Him? Yes!

Read John 20:31 and explain what God has made known to us from the words of the Bible.

Learning about God

In what ways does God help us learn more about who He is? [through the Bible, by seeing what He has made and done, answers to prayers, testimonies of other Christians, etc.]

Talk about ways in which the children can specifically learn more about God. [e.g., listening carefully during Bible teaching time in Sunday school, during the worship service, parents’ teaching, etc.]

Always More to Learn about God

Ask the children what it means if someone refers to another person as a “know-it-all.”

Can any of us be considered a “know-it-all” about God? Does that include adults and older people, even Sunday school teachers or pastors? Will any of us ever be able to completely know and understand the answers to the questions “Who is God?” and “What is God like?” Why is it a good thing that God is incomprehensible, and what should that encourage us to do? [e.g., God is greater and more wonderful than we could ever imagine. Every day we can learn new things about God. God will never get “old or boring.” We don’t need to feel frustrated or give up because we can’t understand everything about God, etc.]

Loving and Trusting God

Point out that even though God is incomprehensible, He makes us able to understand enough about Him to trust and love Him (1 Corinthians 2:12).

Do you want to understand more about who God is and what He is like? Why or why not? Why is it important that we learn about how great God is?

Give practical suggestions about how they could learn more about God in the coming week (e.g., having daily Bible time). Pray with the children that you would have hearts and minds that would desire to learn more about God this week.

Responding to the Greatness of God

Have you ever been amazed by something you have seen? Give an example of something amazing you have seen that you have not fully understood (e.g., a beautiful sunset). How do people usually respond to something amazing, that’s too wonderful to completely understand? How should we respond to the “more than we can understand” greatness of God?

Read Psalm 145:2-3.

How can you respond to the greatness of God this week?

Trusting God When Bad Things Happen

Quickly review the “bad” things that happened in Job’s life.

When God allows things to happen to us that are hard to understand, even things that hurt us or cause us to feel sad, is it right to think that we will always be able to understand why God is allowing those things to happen? What did Job find out from God? (Recall Job 42:3b.) How can we trust God when sad things happen? Would it be easier to trust God by knowing Him more or less? Why would it be easier to trust Him more when we know more about what He is like? [e.g., If we know that a man is a trained fireman, we can be more confident of his ability to help us if there were a fire in our home.] How can you learn more about God this week? Is there something that you would like to know about Him that would help you with a hard situation? How can we pray about this situation?

28 Promises Your Children Can Depend Upon

Promise Item

Speaking of hymns (see yesterday’s post), one hymn I learned early on was Standing On the Promises by R. Kelso Carter. The hymn included these memorable and reassuring words:

Standing on the promises that cannot fail,

When the howling storms of doubt and fear assail,

By the living Word of God I shall prevail,

Standing on the promises of God.

But though I had the words and tune memorized, I don’t remember anyone actually describing and explaining what these promises were. What was I supposed to be standing on? Well here are 28 promises found in the Bible—all given by a faithful God who ALWAYS keeps His promises—that our children should know and can depend upon:

God promises…

  • salvation for everyone who truly repents and believes in Jesus.
  • eternal punishment (hell) for everyone who does not repent and believe in Jesus. (Yes, our children need to know that some promises are dreadful!)

For God’s children, those who trust in Jesus, God’s promises include…

  • God will be with you everywhere, at all times, watching over your life.
  • nothing can separate you from God’s love.
  • complete forgiveness when you confess your sins.
  • God will complete His work in you, making you more and more like Jesus.
  • you will bear fruit (good works).
  • God will hear your prayers.
  • He will guide you to know what is right.
  • God will provide for your needs.
  • He will not withhold any good thing that is good for your life.
  • God will fight for you and act on your behalf.
  • He is slow to anger and is patient with you.
  • God will give you strength.
  • though you may stumble, God will sustain and hold you.
  • God will discipline you for your good because He loves you.
  • He plans good for you, and He brings new mercies everyday.
  • God will be with you in hard times.
  • He will not bring any unnecessary suffering into your life.
  • If you remain steadfast under trial, you will be rewarded.
  • God will keep you from ultimate harm and guard your soul and faith.
  • He will deliver you from all your troubles.
  • God will end suffering for His children and turn it to joy.
  • All things will work together for your good.
  • God will never forsake you.
  • He will never forget His promises.
  • God is not slow in keeping His promises—His timing is perfect.
  • eternal life—living forever with Jesus!

Here are two wonderful resources to help your children learn and explore the biblical foundation of these promises, as well as how they are meant to be embraced and applied to our lives.

Curriculum:

Faithful to All His Promises: A Study for Children on the Promises of God
Grade Range: 2nd Grade-4th Grade, 40 lessons
Children will not simply learn about some of God’s promises, but rather, they will discover what it means to trust in those promises, which are God’s gift to us, not something we deserve. Faithful to All His Promises begins by teaching children what a promise is, what makes God trustworthy with these promises, and who these promises are for. Then children get to explore some specific promises from God to see how He has been and will be faithful to each of those promises.

Family devotional book:

CPGPGod’s Promises
This book is adapted from the curriculum and is a read-to and read-along book for parents with early elementary-age children. Each chapter ends with personal application and activities, and includes full-color illustrations. (120 pages)

 

Something’s Missing

Now Available: The ABCs of God

We try to include an array of helpful resources in our curricula, and the newly revised ABCs of God curriculum is no exception. However, something very important is missing—on purpose. What is it? Let me convey a true story that will emphasize what it is and why it’s missing.

19A-RefugeAbout 20 years ago, I was busy writing the first version of The ABCs of God for use in our church. At the time, I was teaching the first grade Sunday school class. The lesson for an upcoming Sunday was “Refuge—God is a place of safety for His people.” I had the lesson prepared with Bible texts studied and all the visuals prepped and ready to go. But something very important was missing…an unexpected “gift” as it were. That “gift” dramatically changed the way in which I presented the lesson.

What was the gift I’m referring to? Oddly enough, it came in the early morning hours soon after my husband Bruce had left for work, riding his bike as usual. I got the phone call from our pastor. Bruce was okay, but he had been shot while biking through the neighborhood. A man had held up a gun, demanded his money, and then simply pulled the trigger. But, interestingly enough, as he pulled that trigger his hand fell and Bruce was shot in the foot instead of the chest.

After the initial shock of hearing that my husband had been shot—in the foot no less—you know what immediately came to mind? God is our refuge and strength. God is a place of safety and protection for His people. No matter what happens—even if that bullet had taken his life—my husband would have been safe in the arms of Jesus. God truly is a refuge! I have seen and experienced Him as a strong tower!

The name of the LORD is a strong tower; the righteous man runs into it and is safe.—Proverbs 18:10

Tower of Refuge

That experience was a gift—it completely changed the manner in which I presented the lesson to those first graders, because my mind and heart had been deeply impacted and transformed by the biblical truths written into the lesson. The list of Scripture texts were no mere words on a page. God’s Word was shown to be powerful, effective, reliable, and true in a scary situation.

That Sunday, at the end of the lesson, I briefly shared what had happened to my husband—without being overly dramatic or scary. I ended the story with a note of confidence: For everyone who is trusting in Jesus, God WILL BE your refuge in every circumstance—even death, because going to be with Jesus forever is the greatest refuge of all! All eyes and ears were completely focused as I told this story. And I think the children got the point. Because, though not everyone (thankfully) will experience being shot, we all face scary things. Children may fear bullies, math tests, getting sick, grandpa dying, thunderstorms, robbers, etc. Conveying a real-life experience can help them grasp what it truly means that God is a refuge.

So what’s missing from the curriculum? You, teaching from a mind and heart that has been transformed by His Word and, when appropriate, briefly sharing experiences God has brought into your life that serve to demonstrate His greatness and worth.

 

NOW AVAILABLE: The ABCs of God

Now Available: The ABCs of God

The ABCs of God revised curriculum is now here! This 40-week Sunday school curriculum helps first grade children discover our amazing God who is worthy of our greatest love, honor, trust and obedience.

Who is God?
What is God like?
How should I act toward God?

The answers to these questions are of utmost importance in the life of faith for children and adults alike. The ABCs of God uses the framework of the alphabet to introduce children to the attributes of God from Almighty (God is all-powerful) to Zealous (God acts with His whole heart).

Take advantage of this exciting opportunity to teach the children in your church or home about God’s character. Then join with us in our prayer that your children will desperately seek God, passionately love Him, unceasingly trust and obey Him, and forever enjoy Him.

Sample Lessons

Order Now

Our best selling curriculum is now better than ever!

The ABCs of God Classroom KitUpdated Lessons

Lessons have been refined to include stronger illustrations, deeper main points, increased teacher student interaction, detailed instructions for teachers and a streamlined format.

 

 

The ABCs of God VisualsAll New Visuals

The lesson visuals have been recreated to better engage students. Now, there are 334 color pages of original photography, Bible illustrations, eye catching graphics and historical images.

 

 

 

The ABCs of God Student WorkbookExpanded Application

Small group application questions have been significantly updated to help leaders facilitate discussions concerning heart changing topics.

The Student Workbook maintains the classic layout with a letter for kids to color each week, but has been updated with more intentional activities and illustrations.

 

The ABCs of God New ActivitiesNew Activities

Bonus Review Activities have been added to each lesson. These sheets refresh children’s memory of previous lessons as themes build on each other.

Two Optional Activities are provided to fill extra class time with interactive learning. They include games, simple crafts and memory verse activities.

 


See how The ABCs of God can fit into your early elementary classes by viewing the Curriculum Sample. To get your own copy, order online or call our customer service team at 877.400.1414.

Would you like to upgrade you curriculum?

If you currently own a copy of The ABCs of God, you may be eligible for a free or discounted Classroom Kit and/or Teacher’s Guide upgrade. Learn more about our upgrade pricing, then call our customer service team at 877.400.1414 to place your order.

 

 

Do You Remember What You Learned in First Grade?

The ABCs of God Visuals

When I think back to my childhood, there are many fond memories that stick out in my mind. One in particular was from a Sunday morning. I sat in a small wooden chair, surrounded by a couple dozen other first grader students, and gazed at the big, shiny red box at the front of the room. What was inside? My teacher started pulling letters out of the box—16 to be exact—and started to spell a word. What word could be that long? INCOMPREHENSIBLE! What did that mean?

The ABCs of God Visuals

Another day, my teacher decided to make cookies for our class. Yum! Out of the box came sugar and butter and flour and chocolate chips and a bowl and a spoon and a spatula. She set them all out on a table and then just stood there, staring at them. She thought they could turn into cookies on their own. How silly.

The ABCs of God VisualsFast forward a decade later, and I was making new memories—this time as a helper in the first grade class. I remember the day the teacher started pulling out bricks with pictures of the plagues from the same, shiny red box. As she explained each of the ten bricks, she slammed them down on the table. The children gasped as one hit another so hard, it broke in half. There was also the day when there was a beautiful throne at the front of the class. The students were bewildered when they saw the special jewelry box—representing God’s greatness and worth—sitting among a pile of smelly, disgusting garbage, instead of being displayed by the royal throne.

Now, another decade or so later, I get to stop in the first grade classroom and see a child’s jaw drop as his teacher pours an entire box of cereal out in front of him. I also have the privilege of designing some of the visuals for The ABCs of God revised curriculum that will help children create the same memories I have.

The ABCs of God VisualsYou see, these memories are so much more than just some fun moments. When I failed to understand all of the nuances of the sovereignty of God, I remembered those 16 letters. God is incomprehensible, He is more than we can fully understand. When I was being lectured in biology about how the world was made through evolution, I remembered that table full of cookie ingredients and how they were helpless without a creator.

Every time I see a brick wall, I am reminded of those plagues and how God is an almighty God. He showed His power so His name could be known throughout the whole earth as the one true God. When I take out the trash, I am reminded that God took the hard path. He took my punishment for my sin to ultimately show His Father’s glory instead of being pampered like a king on earth.

ABCs of God VisualsAnd my morning bowl of cereal? Even though it will only satisfy me until noon, it is a reminder that God is bountiful. He more than enough to satisfy all of my desires. These memories remind me, and children in The ABCs of God classes, who God is, what He is like and how they should act toward Him. These memories help children see God’s greatness and worth every day in the world around them.

Each lesson in The ABCs of God curriculum begins with a concrete illustration like these to help children bridge what they can see and understand with abstract concepts they cannot see or find hard to understand. This deductive teaching style leads children to make observations and draw conclusions as the lesson progresses.

In the revised version of The ABCs of God, we have included 334 pages of new visuals for teachers to use in conjunction with common household items. The visuals assist in telling Bible stories, emphasis key points of the lesson and create illustrations that children will recall in everyday life. Here is a sample of the Visuals Packet:

 

The ABCs of God
The ABCs of God revision will be released tomorrow! To learn more, take a look at the Lesson Samples and view the Scope and Sequence.

 

 

Available July 12: The ABCs of God Revised Curriculum

The ABCs of God Revised Curriculum

Over the past 18 years, churches around the world have been helping their early elementary students answer three important questions: “Who is God?”, “What is God like?” and “How should I act toward God?” Now, we are excited to announce that the revised version of your favorite curriculum, The ABCs of God, will be available July 12!

Over the past year, we have spent time polishing the lessons, adding new application questions, creating over 300 new visuals, illustrating new workbook pages and developing stronger tools for parents. We cannot wait for you to start using this revised curriculum that will better equip your teachers, engage your students and impact your families.

The ABCs of God Revised Curriculum

The ABCs of God is a study for children on the greatness and worth of God. It uses the alphabet as a framework for learning the attributes of God and other terms that describe His character. Through the use of a teaching aid called “The Blessing Box,” students will discover a new attribute of God each week and will be challenged to consider how they should respond to an amazing God who is worthy of their greatest love, honor, trust and obedience.

Sample Lessons

Scope & Sequence

Learn More

Mark your calendars! The ABCs of God will be available to order in just 6 days!

 

 

A Banner to Fly Over Your Parenting and Children’s Ministry

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What if we were to take this statement and make it a type of banner to fly over our parenting and children’s and youth ministries in the coming years?

Our aim is not to take a child’s low views of self and replace them with high views of self. Rather our aim is to take a child’s low views of God and replace them with high views of God. Our aim is not to take a child with little sense of worth and fill him with a great sense of worth. Rather our aim is to take a child who by nature makes himself the center of the universe and show him that he was made to put God at the center of the universe and get joy not from seeing his own tiny worth, but from knowing Christ who is of infinite worth.

(“Predestined for Adoption to the Praise of His Glory,” by John Piper, ©Desiring God Foundation, desiringGod.org)

Think of how countercultural and even counterintuitive this is…and yet it is so radically biblical and life-giving for our children! In many ways, our resources have been developed underneath this sweeping banner. For example, our first two distinctions are:

  • A Big Vision of God

Our curricula aims to acquaint children with the incomparable majesty of the triune God by digging deep into His divine character as revealed throughout Scripture. We believe that children should be taught the beauty and grandeur of His manifold perfections. In completing our scope and sequence, children will have learned and explored, with increasing depth, more than 20 distinct attributes of God.

  • The Centrality of God in All Things

Every lesson in every curriculum aims to magnify the triune God above all—His name, fame, honor, and glory. We believe children will find their greatest joy when they esteem God most. Therefore, the lessons use language, illustrations, and applications that point children toward God-adoration. Furthermore, the curricula challenge children to see that every aspect of life is to fall under centrality of God and His sovereign rule.

Every resource we develop seeks to do these things—from nursery and beyond. Two resources in particular are designed to give children a “high view” of God by carefully focusing on His divine attributes and character.

The ABCs of God: A Study for Children on the Greatness and Worth of God (1st – 3rd Grade, 40 lessons)
The ABCs of God was written to present children with the beauty and awesome grandeur of the incomparable greatness and worth of God. Toward this end, this curriculum uses the framework of the alphabet to teach children key attributes of God and other words that define His character. These are deep doctrinal truths that answer the most important questions for each of us, namely, “Who is God? What is God like? How should I respond to God?”

(Note: The revised version of The ABCs of God will be available Summer 2016. Watch the blog for further updates.)

How Majestic Is Your Name: A Study for Children on the Names and Character of God (5th – 6th Grade, 40 lessons)
The names of God in the Bible are a reflection of His character, which is so glorious that He cannot be described by a single name. His character is communicated in hundreds of names progressively revealed in the Bible. But the focus of How Majestic Is Your Name is not the many names, titles and references to God. This are merely the structure to show the greatness of our God. Each lesson presents glorious truths about God and encourages students to see and rejoice in His goodness and greatness.

Is your church already using one or both of these curricula? Have you and your children been encouraged as you have seen a great and marvelous view of God and the surpassing worth of Christ? We would be delighted if you would share an encouraging testimony with us and others.

(Image courtesy of photoexplorer at FreeDigitalPhotos.net.)

Why Choose CDG Curriculum?

CDG-for-web

One of the surprising (but delightful) statistics from our recent National Conference was the number of attendees who are new to the ministry of Children Desiring God. For them, the conference served as their first real exposure to our vision, mission, and philosophy. At the conference, they got a high-dose, jam-packed introduction to our ministry. And yet only a relatively small portion of the conference was focused on our curricula, and this was intentional. Why? Because the curricula is NOT the vision of CDG. Rather, it serves as one tool for accomplishing the vision. We believe that it is a valuable and helpful tool, and of course we would be delighted if you would use our curricula in your churches and/or homes.

We also know that there are other wonderful curricula out there to choose from. So why choose CDG? Here are some distinctions we offer:

Our curriculum is committed to…

  • A Big Vision of God
  • The Centrality of God in All Things
  • Doctrinal Depth, Accuracy, and Clarity
  • Faithfulness to the Gospel
  • A Serious and Sober View of Sin
  • A Scope and Sequence that Aims to Present the Whole Counsel of God
  • A Rigorous Study of the Bible and Training of the Mind
  • Age-Appropriate Visuals and Illustrations that Enhance the Learning Experience
  • Personal Application that Encourages a Proper Response in the Mind, Heart, and Will
  • Excitement for God’s Global Purposes
  • Maximizing Classroom Time with Biblical Teaching and Spiritual Discussion
  • Assisting Parents in Discipling their Children
  • Stewardship of Resources

To read a further explanation of each, click here.

 

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